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Can composting toilet system solve sanitation issues in India and other countries?

Composting toilets are waterless and odourless and the waste is turned into soil fertilizer. The extracted liquid is biologically cleaned. 

Could this be a solution to solving the sanitation issues in India? 

Would people stop open defecation and use these toilets if they were available? 

How long do you think it takes people to get used to it? 

Posted on The Water Network.

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Composting toilet is a good innovation but to make it popular in India and gets it maximum advantage will take years because Common Public doesn't know the use of Tissue Paper for cleaning purpose. Even 100% public staying in Urban areas don't know about Tissue Papers and their use in Toilets. So the Government of India must think for some alternate systems also.

Open defecation is a major threat to the health and well being of the citizens of India and other countries. Biotoilets, also called as "composting toilets", can play a pivotal role in uplifting the sanitation conditions of these areas. These toilets comprise of 2 units, the superstructure and biodigestor tank. The latter is a multi-chambered unit comprising of robust microbes which facilitate the breakdown of complex waste molecules in to simpler molecules via anaerobic digestion. This anaerobic digestion process comprises of 4 major steps including hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis and methanogenesis. Advanced microbial culture is the heart of any biotoilet. Mnay companies in India, like DRDO and Organica Biotech, provide  good quality microbial products which not reduce sludge volumes but also curb the production of foul odour. Added  benefits of biotoilets are that these are portable, economical and easy to install.

I have seen such traditional toilet systems in some parts of Himalayas, especially in Spiti Valley in Himachal Pradesh. Later, I found that it was common in many parts of Himalayas. Unfortunately, in most parts, people have abandoned this system of traditional toilets. In Spiti as the organic farming has gained popularity and this system of toilets are stilled used.

Not a single technology in any field can solve a problem. Similarly composting toilet also not able to resolve the complete solution in field of sanitation. Yes could be play an important role where scarcity of water as well as supportive environment available. Supportive environment like natural, legal and social. Therefore before implementing any technology we have focus on creating such environment and awareness among people and governing agencies. 

 



Khushboo Shroff said:

Open defecation is a major threat to the health and well being of the citizens of India and other countries. Biotoilets, also called as "composting toilets", can play a pivotal role in uplifting the sanitation conditions of these areas. These toilets comprise of 2 units, the superstructure and biodigestor tank. The latter is a multi-chambered unit comprising of robust microbes which facilitate the breakdown of complex waste molecules in to simpler molecules via anaerobic digestion. This anaerobic digestion process comprises of 4 major steps including hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis and methanogenesis. Advanced microbial culture is the heart of any biotoilet. Mnay companies in India, like DRDO and Organica Biotech, provide  good quality microbial products which not reduce sludge volumes but also curb the production of foul odour. Added  benefits of biotoilets are that these are portable, economical and easy to install.

Dear Khushboo, I'm very well aware of the process of Biotoilets. I raised a simple concern about the implementation of this type of toilets. Even my company M/s JM EnviroTechnologies is providing a blend of Anaerobic & Facultative Bacteria for such applications. You should also give your views about my concern.

In Spiti valley, the traditional toilet system is a dry pit toilet with separate innovative water separator, soaked in soil. Very little water is used, as it doesn't  require flushing. It doesn't smell bad. They also put the kitchen waste and animal dung in it. Its a simple and cost effective design without any special bacterial culture. It may not be suitable for cities but definitely the best solution for rural India. It could be combined with biogas plant with some innovative design.

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